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Department of Biochemistry

 
Transcription factors can prefer one orientation over others when binding to nucleosomal DNA
Read more at: Graphene-based electrodes for microbial fuel cells
Rhodopseudomonas palustris bacteria on a carbon foam electrode

Graphene-based electrodes for microbial fuel cells

The Howe Group, and collaborators at the Cambridge Graphene Centre, have published an article in the Royal Society of Chemistry's Journal of Materials Chemistry A.


Read more at: Green electronics: a bacteria-powered clock
A printed cyanobacteria bioelectrode

Green electronics: a bacteria-powered clock

The Howe Group and their collaborators have published a paper in Nature Communications demonstrating that printed cyanobacteria can be used as a two-in-one bio-battery and bio-solar-panel.


Read more at: Part III student Keir Murison publishes in The Biochemist
Keir Murison in the laboratory

Part III student Keir Murison publishes in The Biochemist

Keir Murison has co-authored an article for The Biochemist magazine.


Read more at: £225 raised for BBC Children in Need
The Department's Halloween bake sale

£225 raised for BBC Children in Need

Halloween and the final of The Great British Bake Off on the same day can only mean one thing; the Department held a spooky bake sale to raise money for BBC Children in Need!


Read more at: Insights into enzymes that break down plant cell walls
Structure of the LsAA9A enzyme bound to a carbohydrate chain

Insights into enzymes that break down plant cell walls

The Dupree Group have published a paper in Nature Communications offering insight into enzymes that break down plant cell walls.


Image

Transcription factors can prefer one orientation over others when binding to nucleosomal DNA.

Credit: Fangjie Zhu, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge.