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Department of Biochemistry

 
Group Leaders at the Department's annual Away Days in 2002.
Read more at: Austin Smith
Austin Smith

Austin Smith

Embryo stem cell biology.


Read more at: Richard Jackson
Richard Jackson

Richard Jackson

Mechanisms of translation initiation site selection in eukaryotic and viral mRNA.


Read more at: Ellen Nisbet
Ellen Nisbet

Ellen Nisbet

Molecular evolution - from algae to malaria.


Read more at: Jules Griffin
Jules Griffin

Jules Griffin

Lipid profiling and signalling.


Read more at: Simone Weyand
Simone Weyand

Simone Weyand

Membrane protein structure, function and cellular activities.


Read more at: Stephanie Jung
Stephanie Jung

Stephanie Jung

Platelet collagen receptor GPVI-dimer.


Read more at: Jasmin Fisher
Jasmin Fisher

Jasmin Fisher

Executable biology.


Read more at: Nancy Standart
Nancy Standart

Nancy Standart

Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression.


Read more at: Rick Livesey
Rick Livesey

Rick Livesey

Mammalian neural stem cell biology.


Read more at: Nick Robinson
Nick Robinson

Nick Robinson

Coordinating DNA repair and chromosomal replication.


Read more at: Giorgio Favrin
Giorgio Favrin

Giorgio Favrin

Building a systems view of Alzheimer's disease.


Read more at: Hee-Jeon Hong
Hee-Jeon Hong

Hee-Jeon Hong

Bacterial infections and immunity.


Read more at: José Silva
José Silva

José Silva

Biology of induced pluripotency.


Read more at: Tom Monie
Tom Monie

Tom Monie

Structure and function of the NOD-like receptors NOD1 and NOD2.


Read more at: Karen Lipkow
Karen Lipkow

Karen Lipkow

Functional relationships between cellular signalling and architecture.


Read more at: Anton Wutz
Anton Wutz

Anton Wutz

Epigenetic regulation and cell identity control.


Read more at: John McCafferty
John McCafferty

John McCafferty

Cell-cell interactions.


Read more at: Natasha Murzina
Natasha Murzina

Natasha Murzina

Protein complexes in control of gene expression.


Image

Group Leaders at the Department's annual Away Days in 2002.

Credit: Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge.