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Vacancies in the Department

Post-doctoral Research Associate in Ultrahigh-throughput Exploration of Metagenomic Libraries (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on May 16, 2016.

A postdoctoral position is available for 12 months (with a possibility of extension) from 1 August 2016 (or later) to work with Florian Hollfelder on ultrahigh-throughput exploration of metagenomics libraries. Metagenomes comprise enormous reservoirs coding for proteins with useful activities, but harvesting this potential is difficult, because useful candidates are rare and hidden in an overwhelming majority of irrelevant genes. Traditionally screening campaigns of metagenomic libraries thus have required massive capital-expenditure for robotic systems and much manpower, making them expensive, slow and available to very few users.

We have just shown (Colin et al. Nature Communications 2015, 6:10008. doi: 10.1038/ncomms10008) that exploration and exploitation of the metagenome is accelerated and made more successful by ultrahigh-throughput screening in picoliter droplets: allowing throughput of tens of millions of assays per hour, at dramatically lower cost (and work!) per assay. We now want to use this platform technology to identify enzymes for biosynthesis of therapeutic small molecules, for green bioenergy conversion, bioremediation, food chemistry and other industrial applications. The postdoc project involves establishment of suitable assays for these tasks in microdroplet format, building environmental metagenomics libraries and looking for new catalysts that are then characterised mechanistically and structurally.

Candidates with a background (and published track record) in protein engineering, mechanistic enzymology, organic synthesis and microfluidic engineering are highly desirable. Candidates must hold (or be in the final stages of completing) a PhD in a relevant discipline.

The work is part of the EU Project 'Metafluidics' that involves collaborations with companies and academic groups in Spain, Denmark, Norway, France, Portugal and the UK.

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 1 year in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Informal enquiries can be made to Dr Florian Hollfelder -fh111@cam.ac.uk

Please quote reference PH09142 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Post-doctoral Research Associate: Construction of a genome scale functional proteomic map (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Apr 28, 2016.

This postdoctoral research position is for a collaborative project of the Ralser Lab. (Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge and The Francis Crick Institute) and the Lilley Lab. (Cambridge Centre for Proteomics, University of Cambridge), and aims, in collaboration with the mass spectrometry manufacturing industry, to construct the first genome-spanning proteomic map of a eukaryote. This is an exciting, but challenging project, will yield a novel depth of the insight into how the eukaryotic proteome is functioning, and combines the complementary experience of the Ralser and Lilley Labs.

Here, we aim to recruit an experimentalist, however, as we will also seek a computational postdoctoral researcher to join the team, postdocs/PhDs with a relevant background in computational biology/ biological machine learning or data processing are encouraged to apply as well.

The ideal candidate will have recently completed, or is about to complete a PhD in Biology, Biochemistry, or Systems Biology, and has either had contact with yeast or microbial functional genetics or genomics, proteomics, or metabolomics. Ideally, the candidate will have hands-on experience with liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, or similar analytical hardware. As for all projects of data-driven biology, apart from the listed experimental skills, we welcome applicants with an affinity for computational data processing that exceed beyond using Office software, although we will provide the appropriate training. The candidate must possess a track record that documents his/her productivity in the biosciences, and is willing to join a dynamic team both located in Cambridge and at the Francis Crick Institute.

Fixed-term: The project is intended to be completed in 2020; the post is available for 1 year in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Further information is available from Markus Ralser - mr559@cam.ac.uk

Please quote reference PH09015 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Postdoctoral Research Associate - Informatician (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on May 20, 2016.

Proteomics/Mass Spectrometry, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Central Cambridge.

We are seeking to employ an enthusiastic postdoctoral scientist to join the Cambridge Centre for Proteomics, at the University of Cambridge, led by Professor Kathryn Lilley. The successful candidate will work on a project funded by a joint Wellcome Trust Investigator award to Professor Anne Willis (MRC Toxicology Unit, University of Leicester) and Professor Kathryn Lilley. The project is entitled "Transcription, Trafficking, Translation: dissecting the spatiotemporal mechanisms underlying localised protein synthesis".

It is now widely acknowledged that mRNA is spatially organised such that its translation frequently occurs in the vicinity where the corresponding protein product adopts its function. This phenomenon has been studied extensively in specialised cells, however, recent research has suggested that spatial restriction of mRNA storage and translation is much more widespread.

The aims of this project are to define where translation of mRNA takes place in the cell, how this is regulated by protein binding partners and sequence motifs and how this changes upon cellular perturbation.

We are building a team of RNA biologists, mass spectrometrists, and informaticians to help tackle these challenging aims.

This post involves the development of machine learning approaches to interrogate spatial data from proteomics and transcriptomics experiments. Creation of on-line resources to allow public accessibility of data. All post-holders will be expected to assist in the creation of a series of workshops and public outreach events to disseminate methods, data and concepts to the wider community.

The ideal applicant will have (or in the final stages of completing) a PhD in computational biology with a background in dealing with large data sets generated from proteomics and/or next generation sequencing. A knowledge of machine learning tools and the R programming language is essential.

The following recent publication has direct relevance to this project: 1. A draft map of the mouse pluripotent stem cell spatial proteome. Christoforou et al Nature Commun. 20167:8992. doi:10.1038/ncomms9992 2. Learning from Heterogeneous Data Sources: An Application in Spatial Proteomics. Breckels et al PLoS Comput Biol. 2016 May 13;12(5):e1004920. doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004920

For more information please visit: http://www.bioc.cam.ac.uk/people/uto/lilley and http://tox.mrc.ac.uk/

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 3 years in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Informal enquiries can be made to Professor Lilley - k.s.lilley@bioc.cam.ac.uk

Please quote reference PH09168 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Postdoctoral Research Associate - Proteomics/Mass Spectrometrist (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on May 20, 2016.

Proteomics/Mass Spectrometry, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Central Cambridge.

We are seeking to employ an enthusiastic postdoctoral scientist to join the Cambridge Centre for Proteomics at the University of Cambridge, led by Professor Kathryn Lilley. The successful candidate will work on a project funded by a joint Wellcome Trust Investigator award to Professor Anne Willis (MRC Toxicology Unit, University of Leicester) and Professor Lilley. The project is entitled "Transcription, Trafficking, Translation: dissecting the spatiotemporal mechanisms underlying localised protein synthesis".

It is now widely acknowledged that mRNA is spatially organised such that its translation frequently occurs in the vicinity where the corresponding protein product adopts its function. This phenomenon has been studied extensively in specialised cells, however, recent research has suggested that spatial restriction of mRNA storage and translation is much more widespread.

The aims of this project are to define where translation of mRNA takes place in the cell, how this is regulated by protein binding partners and sequence motifs and how this changes upon cellular perturbation.

We are building a team of RNA biologists, mass spectrometrists, and informaticians to help tackle these challenging aims.

This post involves the development and application of spatial proteomics methods including hyperLOPIT (1) and proximity tagging approaches to make detailed maps of the subcellular proteome of various mammalian cell lines, maps of location of RNA binding proteins, and how these change upon cell perturbation such as insulin stimulation

The ideal applicant will have (or in the final stages of completing) a PhD in biological sciences with expertise in proteomics, mass spectrometry and cell biology. Some knowledge of informatics is also desired.

The following recent publication has direct relevance to this project: 1. A draft map of the mouse pluripotent stem cell spatial proteome. Christoforou et al Nat Commun. 20167:8992. doi: 10.1038/ncomms9992

For more information please visit: http://www.bioc.cam.ac.uk/people/uto/lilley and http://tox.mrc.ac.uk/

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 5 years in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Informal enquiries can be made to Professor Lilley - k.s.lilley@bioc.cam.ac.uk

Please quote reference PH09167 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Postdoctoral Research Associate - RNA Biologist/Proteomics (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on May 20, 2016.

Proteomics/Mass Spectrometry, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Central Cambridge.

We are seeking to employ an enthusiastic postdoctoral scientist to join the Cambridge Centre for Proteomics at the University of Cambridge, led by Professor Kathryn Lilley. The successful candidate will work on a project funded by a joint Wellcome Trust Investigator award to Professor Anne Willis (MRC Toxicology Unit, University of Leicester) and Professor Lilley. The project is entitled "Transcription, Trafficking, Translation: dissecting the spatiotemporal mechanisms underlying localised protein synthesis".

It is now widely acknowledged that mRNA is spatially organised such that its translation frequently occurs in the vicinity where the corresponding protein product adopts its function. This phenomenon has been studied extensively in specialised cells, however, recent research has suggested that spatial restriction of mRNA storage and translation is much more widespread.

The aims of this project are to define where translation of mRNA takes place in the cell, how this is regulated by protein binding partners and sequence motifs and how this changes upon cellular perturbation.

We are building a team of RNA biologists, mass spectrometrists, and informaticians to help tackle these challenging aims.

This post involves the creation of RNA correlation profiling methods, including sub cellular fractionation, cross linking of RNA to binding proteins and next generation sequencing.

The ideal applicant will have (or in the final stages of completing) a PhD in Biological Sciences with expertise in RNA biology, translation, cell biology, cell fractionation and next generation sequencing methods. Some knowledge of mass spectrometry would also be advantageous, along with an interest in informatics and the handling of large datasets.

The following recent publication has direct relevance to this project: 1. A draft map of the mouse pluripotent stem cell spatial proteome. Christoforou et al Nat Commun. 20167:8992. doi: 10.1038/ncomms9992

For more information please visit: http://www.bioc.cam.ac.uk/people/uto/lilley and http://tox.mrc.ac.uk/

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 5 years in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Informal enquiries can be made to Professor Lilley - k.s.lilley@bioc.cam.ac.uk

Please quote reference PH09166 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Postdoctoral Research Associate in Microbial Membrane Proteomics (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on May 12, 2016.

DeTOX - Productive whole cell biocatalysis by engineering resistance to toxic products and substrates

Proteomics/Mass Spectrometry, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge.

This post represents an outstanding opportunity for a protein biochemist to join a multi-disciplinary team working on a flagship BBSRC Industrial Biocatalyst Award involving research groups in York, Sheffield, Nottingham and Cambridge along with five commercial partners. Product yields of many important industrial fermentations are limited by chemical (product) toxicity and this consortium aims to gather extensive fundamental information using a range of cutting edge 'omic's-based techniques to learn how accumulation of these chemicals leads to severe cell stress and eventually death. The project ("DeTox") will also engineer a variety of solutions into these strains to produce more tolerant versions. This will include engineering increased resistance to small molecules in the industrially relevant bacteria, E. coli & solventogenic Clostridia.

As part of this consortium, the Lilley group is keen to employ a post doctoral researcher to work as part of this project with the aim of characterising bacterial membrane proteins and how their abundance, protein stability, and membrane location correlates with adaptation to engineered production of small molecules. The project will make use of cutting edge proteomics techniques and mass spectrometry approaches developed in the Lilley lab. including spatial proteomics to map proteins to bacterial membranes and protein complexes. (HyperLOPIT- Nature Communications (2016) doi: 10.1038/ncomms9992).

The ideal applicant will have a PhD in a biological science and ideally expertise in protein chemistry, quantitative proteomics, mass spectrometry and microbiology.

The post will involve very close interaction with the other groups within the DeTOX consortium, and involve some limited travel to the other sites, training in fermentation processes, and informatics tools (EchoBASE -Bioinformatics. 2009 Jan 15;25(2):163-6. doi: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btn596.)

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 3 years in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Informal enquiries can be made to Kathryn Lilley - k.s.lilley@bioc.cam.ac.uk

Please quote reference PH09128 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Research Assistant/Associate: Novel analgesics based on antagonism of TRPV1-AKAP binding (Efficacy Studies) (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on May 03, 2016.

A postdoctoral research associate or research assistant position is available for a joint BBSRC-funded project between Dr Katherine Stott of the Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, and Prof Peter McNaughton, of King's College London. Please note that this position will be located in University of Cambridge space on the GlaxoSmithKline Open Innovation campus, Stevenage. In additional to this position we have two postdoctoral research associate posts which are currently being advertised, vacancy refs: PH09023 - http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/10246 and PH09024 -http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/10247.

The aim of the work is to develop novel analgesics that will act by preventing the interaction between the TRPV1 ion channel and a scaffolding protein named AKAP79. Previous work in our labs has identified this binding site as an important analgesic drug target, and the aim of the project is now to enhance our knowledge of the structure of the site, and then to employ this knowledge to develop novel peptides that can be tested in animal models of human pain conditions. Thus the project spans the whole range from structural biology through to drug development.

For this research associate or research assistant position we will study the efficacy of peptides that can interrupt the TRPV1-AKAP79 interaction as novel analgesics. An essential requirement is extensive experience in the use of animal models of human painful conditions, and expertise with models of neuropathic pain and painful diabetic neuropathy would be an advantage. We will fill this post at either the postdoctoral research associate or the research assistant level, depending on the skills and qualifications of the successful applicant.

The post-holder will work mainly with Christina Hanack and Peter McNaughton in the Stevenage Bioscience Catalyst (SBC) building, located in University of Cambridge space on the GlaxoSmithKline Open Innovation campus, Stevenage, but will also work on other aspects of the project (see separate advertisements) and will need to travel on a regular basis to Cambridge (travel will be reimbursed).

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 2 years in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Applicants should submit a CV with list of relevant publications, a cover letter explaining why they are suitable for the position and the contact details of at least two referees.

Informal enquiries can be made to either Katherine Stott at ks123@cam.ac.uk or Peter McNaughton at peter.mcnaughton@kcl.ac.uk.

Please quote reference PH09026 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Research Associate: Novel analgesics based on antagonism of TRPV1-AKAP binding (Functional Studies) (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on May 03, 2016.

This is one of two postdoctoral research associate positions that are available for a joint BBSRC-funded project between Dr Katherine Stott of the Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, and Prof Peter McNaughton, of King's College London. Please note that this position will be located in University of Cambridge space on the GlaxoSmithKline Open Innovation campus, Stevenage. For further details on the second post-doctoral position please view the separate advertisement on the Cambridge University website, vacancy ref: PH09023 - http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/10246.

The project is also looking to recruit a postdoctoral research associate or research assistant, vacancy ref: PH09026 - http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/10249

The aim of the work is to develop novel analgesics that will act by preventing the interaction between the TRPV1 ion channel and a scaffolding protein named AKAP79. Previous work in our labs has identified this binding site as an important analgesic drug target, and the aim of the project is now to enhance our knowledge of the structure of the site, and then to employ this knowledge to develop novel peptides that can be tested in animal models of human pain conditions. Thus the project spans the whole range from structural biology through to drug development.

For this postdoctoral position we aim to purify TRPV1 and AKAP79, or fragments that contain the interacting domains, and will study the ability of peptide antagonists to prevent the interaction. Essential requirements are a detailed knowledge of protein purification and of assays (such as surface plasmon resonance) used to study protein-protein interaction.

Candidates must either hold or be about to be awarded a PhD.

The post-holder will work mainly with Christina Hanack and Peter McNaughton in the Stevenage Bioscience Catalyst (SBC) building, located in University of Cambridge space on the GlaxoSmithKline Open Innovation campus, Stevenage, but will also work on other aspects of the project (see separate advertisements) and will need to travel on a regular basis to Cambridge (travel will be reimbursed).

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 2 years in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Applicants should submit a CV with list of relevant publications, a cover letter explaining why they are suitable for the position and the contact details of at least two referees.

Informal enquiries can be made to either Katherine Stott at ks123@cam.ac.uk or Peter McNaughton at peter.mcnaughton@kcl.ac.uk.

Please quote reference PH09024 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Research Associate: Novel analgesics based on antagonism of TRPV1-AKAP binding (Structural Biology/NMR) (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on May 03, 2016.

This is one of two postdoctoral research associate positions that are available for a joint BBSRC-funded project between Dr Katherine Stott of the Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, and Prof Peter McNaughton, of King's College London. For further details on the second post-doctoral position please view the separate advertisement, vacancy ref: PH09024 - http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/10247

The project is also looking to recruit a postdoctoral research associate/research assistant, vacancy ref: PH09026 - http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/10249

The aim of the work is to develop novel analgesics that will act by preventing the interaction between the TRPV1 ion channel and a scaffolding protein named AKAP79. Previous work in our labs has identified this binding site as an important analgesic drug target, and the aim of the project is now to enhance our knowledge of the structure of the site, and then to employ this knowledge to develop novel peptides that can be tested in animal models of human pain conditions. Thus the project spans the whole range from structural biology through to drug development.

For this postdoctoral position the aim is to use NMR to resolve the molecular structure of the TRPV1-AKAP79 interacting domains. An essential requirement is a detailed knowledge of expression and purification of proteins and the use of NMR in protein structural studies.

Candidates must either hold or be about to be awarded a PhD.

The post-holder will work mainly with Katherine Stott, in the Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge in Central Cambridge but will also be involved closely with other aspects of the project (see separate advertisements) and will need to travel on a regular basis to Stevenage Bioscience Catalyst where major parts of the project will be carried out (travel will be reimbursed).

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 2 years in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Applicants should submit a CV with list of relevant publications, a cover letter explaining why they are suitable for the position and the contact details of at least two referees.

Informal enquiries can be made to either Katherine Stott at ks123@cam.ac.uk or Peter McNaughton at peter.mcnaughton@kcl.ac.uk.

Please quote reference PH09023 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Research Associate: The role of RNA binding proteins in regulating the alternative splicing programme during differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells from embryonic stem cells. (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Apr 29, 2016.

A 2-year postdoctoral research associate position is available to work jointly in the groups of Professor Chris Smith in the University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry and Dr Sanjay Sinha in the Anne McLaren Laboratory, Cambridge Stem Cell Institute, on the roles of critical RNA binding proteins in controlling alternative pre-mRNA splicing programmes during differentiation of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from embryonic stem cells. The project will involve mRNA-Seq profiling of hES to VSMC differentiation, and how this is affected by inducible knockdown or overexpression of regulatory RNA binding proteins.

Candidates will ideally have expertise in: RNA biology (alternative splicing), stem cell biology, smooth muscle cells, analysis of mRNA-seq data-sets.

The successful candidate must have a PhD in a relevant science.

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 2 years in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Informal enquiries can be made to Professor Chris Smith - cwjs1@cam.ac.uk

Please quote reference PH09032 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.