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Vacancies in the Department

BBSRC PhD Studentship

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Jan 05, 2015.

A BBSRC PhD studentship fully funded for four years is available in the laboratory of Professor Paul Dupree. The project is in partnership with Novozymes, the world's largest enzyme discovery and production company.

The industrial collaborative project aims to develop tools and understanding with application to the bioenergy, biorefining and dietary uses of plants. The project goal is to understand the role of the plant cell wall polysaccharide xylan in preventing enzymatic digestion of cellulose microfibrils. Our recent discoveries propose new models for xylan interaction with cellulose (Busse Wicher et al. 2014). The new models suggest new types of enzymes may be involved in plant cell wall deconstruction. The project will use the extensive range of specific recombinant hydrolases and polysaccharide oxidases (e.g. cellulases, xylanases, LPMOs) available from Novozymes, and also the extensive panel of plants with modified plant cell wall synthesis available in the laboratory of Paul Dupree.

The student will spend at least three months in Novozymes, Copenhagen, gaining experience of industrial enzyme discovery and development.

The project will start during the 2015-2016 academic year.

Busse-Wicher M et al. (2014) The pattern of xylan acetylation suggests xylan may interact with cellulose microfibrils as a two-fold helical screw in the secondary plant cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana. Plant J. 79(3):492-506.

Please contact Professor Paul Dupree - pd101@cam.ac.uk for any enquiries.

BBSRC studentship eligibility conditions apply.

http://www.bioenergy.novozymes.com

Please quote reference PH04924 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Marie-Sklodowska-Curie ITN PhD Studentship

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 03, 2015.

A 3-year EU-funded PhD studentship is available in the laboratory of Dr Martin Welch. Applications are invited for a PhD studentship position ("Early Stage Researcher" or ESR) to be funded by the Marie-Sklodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network "INTEGRATE ¿ Interdisciplinary Training Network for Validation of Gram-Negative Antibacterial Targets" within the Horizon 2020 Programme of the European Commission. Researchers are required to undertake trans-national mobility (i.e., move from one country to another) when taking up the appointment.

Project Title: The glyoxylate shunt as a target for antibacterial intervention in Gram-negative bacteria.

The junction between the TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt is widely regarded as one of the most important metabolic branchpoints in the whole of microbial metabolism, and is increasingly being recognized as a major new target for the development of antibacterial compounds (Munoz-Elias & MacKinney, Nature Medicine 11, 638 - 44 (2005) & Sharma et al. Nat Struct Biol. 7(8):663-8 (2000)). In addition, carbon flux through the glyoxylate shunt plays a central role in regulating virulence in the Gram-negative "superbug", Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Chung et al, Open Biology (2013)). Indeed, mutants defective in isocitrate lyase (ICL; the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt) display impaired fitness in vivo. Consequently, compounds that target the enzymes of the glyoxylate shunt, or which reduce the flux of carbon directed through this pathway, may have the dual effect of reducing tissue damage (by blocking virulence) and diminishing the metabolic fitness of the organism in the niche. However, the branchpoint between the TCA cycle and glyoxylate shunt in P. aeruginosa differs markedly from the canonical organisation in E. coli, and nothing is known about its enzymology. The aim of this PhD project is to purify the enzymes involved, and to characterize these in considerable detail as potential targets for antimicrobial intervention. The kinetic parameters of each P. aeruginosa branchpoint enzyme (which includes two isocitrate dehydrogenases (ICD and IDH), a kinase/phosphatase (AceK) and ICL) will be determined, as will the impact of putative allosteric regulators. HTP screening of compound libraries (including natural product and Diversity oriented synthesis (DoS) libraries, available in-house) will be carried out to identify inhibitors/activators of each enzyme. We will characterize the nature of the inhibition/activation mechanisms (competitive, non-competitive, etc.) and attempt to co-crystallize these compounds as complexes bound to their cognate target enzymes.

The appointed ESR will spend at three months seconded to Aptuit (Verona, Italy) and five months seconded with the University of Helsinki (Finland) to allow them to learn and apply new techniques.

Shortlisted candidates will be invited the INTEGRATE Recruitment Event in Verona (Italy) on 5-6 May 2015. The Recruitment Committee will subsequently interview each candidate. In order to cover (part of) your travel and lodging costs, shortlisted candidates will receive a lump sum of €250.

The project will start during the 2015-2016 academic year.

An online application form is available by clicking;

http://www.cdr.fi/news-and-events/integrate-etn-student-application-form

The deadline for applications routed through the above website is March 9th, but Dr welch will still consider applications from exceptional individuals until the end of April. If you wish to apply for this position after March 9th, or if you have any queries regarding the position, please contact Dr Welch directly - mw240@cam.ac.uk .The Welch lab website can be found at: http://www.bioc.cam.ac.uk/people/uto/welch

Please quote reference PH05532 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD Studentship (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 16, 2015.

A vacancy for a PhD student to be fully funded by the NC3Rs for 3 years is available in the Department of Biochemistry, Sanger Building, central Cambridge under the supervision of Dr Frank McCaughan and Professor Gerard Evan.

We have developed a novel organotypic (OTC) model of bronchial dysplasia/early lung cancer. In this system, immortalised normal human bronchial epithelial cells are grown at the air-liquid interface on a collagen matrix with embedded fibroblasts. In OTC there is a clear phenotype in cells in which the activation of putative oncogenes at the air-liquid interface recapitulates a histological phenotype consistent with human bronchial dysplasia/early lung cancer.

In vivo, multiple genetic lesions will co-operate to drive carcinogenesis. We have introduced complexity into our model by combining genetic lesions, which leads to a more marked phenotype.

There are two main objectives: 1) To perform a functional/phenotypic screen with an extended library of small molecule inhibitors in the OTC model of bronchial dysplasia 2) To use genome manipulation tools - CRISPR and lentiviral transduction and alteration of the microenvironment to recapitulate some of the complexity observed in vivo. These refined models will be used for mechanistic studies into lung cancer pathogenesis and to assess the impact of genotype on therapeutic response.

Candidates should have or expect to get a 2i or above in an appropriate discipline.

NC3Rs studentship conditions apply. Please see http://www.findaphd.com/search/PhDDetails.aspx?CAID=1091&LID=1263.

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 36 months in the first instance.

To apply please send your CV and the names and contact details of two or more academic referees to Dr Frank McCaughan - fm319@cam.ac.uk.

Please quote reference PH05655 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Postdoctoral position in G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 19, 2015.

A postdoctoral position is available immediately to work in the laboratory of Dr Daniel Nietlispach, University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry, UK.

The research involves the study of G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCR) and the role that dynamics play in the functional activation of such receptors. A multi-disciplinary approach is followed including NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical methods. The Departmental research facilities include extensive state-of-the-art high field NMR instrumentation (500-800 MHz) and a comprehensive range of biophysics equipment.

Applicants should have a PhD in Biochemistry or the equivalent in a relevant subject. We are seeking a highly motivated individual with a strong background in protein biochemistry, including protein expression and structural biology of membrane proteins. Expertise in biomolecular NMR spectroscopy is of benefit but not a necessity. A suitable candidate will be able to plan and organise his research in an independent and efficient manner.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity. The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for up to 17 months.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Informal inquiries can be made to Dr Daniel Nietlispach - dn206@cam.ac.uk

Please quote reference PH05695 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Research Assistant x 3 (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 26, 2015.

We require three research assistants to pursue research in conjunction with many different projects in the University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry, Central Cambridge to work in the DNA Sequencing Facility. Candidates should be qualified to degree level in a relevant subject or the equivalent and have relevant experience as outlined below.

We are looking for research assistants to assist in the running of the DNA Sequencing Facility, which involves amongst other duties the processing of many thousands of samples which we receive on a regular basis. This requires concentration and good pipetting skills over an extended period. Other duties will include accounts processing, routine maintenance, operation of our equipment and record keeping.

The successful candidates will work in our Genome Sequencing Facility. Relevant experience with Roche 454 FLX and Junior platforms as well as Illumina MiSeq and NextSeq platforms is highly desirable . This will involve library preparation and a knowledge of bioinformatics which is essential.

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 2 years in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

For all informal enquiries please contact John Lester - jbl21@cam.ac.uk

Please quote reference PH05712 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Research Associate (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 27, 2015.

Post-doctoral endothelial cell biochemist.

A Post-doctoral Research Associate position is available to work on the regulation of vascular endothelial cell activity by sub-endothelial collagens. The post is based in University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry, Central Cambridge working in the laboratory of Professor Richard Farndale, and is funded by a British Heart Foundation Programme grant.

The successful applicant will be qualified in biochemistry and/or cell biology, and will have a strong interest in receptor biology. He or she will be fully trained in cell culture, and will preferably be skilled in vascular biology and the measurement of endothelial cell activity. The successful applicant will extract and maintain primary human endothelial cells, and will study their regulation by specific collagen receptors. Transcriptome will be measured using next generation RNAseq, and the RA will apply ligand proximity assays to the identification of novel receptors, then explore the signals elicited in the cells by specific collagen fragments selected from our Collagen Toolkits.

Candidates should have a PhD or the equivalent in a relevant science.

Interviews are anticipated during late April/early May.

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 42 months until 30 November 2018 in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

For all informal enquiries please contact Professor Richard Farndale - rwf10@cam.ac.uk

Please quote reference PH05769 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.